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430307
  • Title
    Collection 02: Australian Indigenous Ministries further records, 1904-1930
  • Call number
    MLMSS 7244
  • Level of description
    Collection
  • Date

    1904-1930
  • Type of material
  • Reference code
    430307
  • Physical Description
    1 box - 0.18 Meters
    Textual Records - (photocopy)
    Textual Records - (typescript, photocopy)
  • ADMINISTRATIVE/ BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY

    Australian Indigenous Ministries (AIM), formerly called The Aborigines Inland Mission, began as an Evangelical movement in Singleton in August, 1905, founded by Retta Long (nee Dixon). Retta Dixon, a Baptist missionary, was associated with the Christian Endeavourer fellowship and New South Wales Aborigines Mission at La Perouse, Sydney. The AIM is currently known as the Australian Indigenous Ministries.
    An Aboriginal Childrens Home was established by Retta Dixon in a large House in George Street, Singleton, known as Glasgow Place. This home and the mission at St Clair were the main initial ventures of the AIM.
    Early in 1906 Retta Dixon married Leonard Long and together they ran the organisation of the AIM for the rest of their lives. In the early years they also took on the roles of superintendant and matron of the Singleton home.
    AIM missionaries commenced their activities at St Clair and Redbournebury (near Singleton) and Karuah (Port Stephens). The first annual AIM convention and first publication of the journal Our AIM occurred in 1907. By this time the organisation had missionaries at Yass, Brungle, Warangesda, Moonacullah, Cummeragunja and Walcha. Aboriginal administration agencies in Queensland and Western Australia approved the placement of AIM missionaries. This led to the beginning of work at Bassendean (W.A.) in 1908, and at Heberton (Qld.) in 1911.
    Aboriginal assistants to AIM missionaries were employed where possible, the first being Alec Russell at Karuah.
    Over the next three decades the AIM extended work to almost every Aboriginal settlement in N.S.W., as well as to Gayndah, Cherbourg, Woorabinda, Palm Island, Normanton, Stradbroke Island, Ravenshoe and Cooktown in Queensland, Port Augusta and Tarcoola in South Australia, and Parap (near Darwin) in the Northern Territory.
    (Source: Encyclopaedia of Aboriginal Australia, 1994)
  • Scope and Content
    Photocopies of records of the Aborigines Inland Mission (AIM):
    1. Correspondence from and regarding AIM staff including applications for AIM missionary service
    1905-1930; Missionary roll - List of missionaries in service with the AIM, including date of commencement, place of origin and Date of resignation.
    1907-1908; Application inquiries
    c.1907; Acland, Margaret - Application for AIM missionary service.
    1907-1908; Allen,Jean - Correspondence.
    1907; Anderson, Clara - Letter to Mrs Long from Sackville Reach regarding the Everingham family and Billy Bond.
    1913; Beer, Selby - Letter regarding the printing of Our Aim newsletter.
    1915; Belshaw, Mary - Application for AIM missionary service. Correspondence.
    1918-1919; Bock, Mrs - Correspondence.
    1910-1913; Burgess, Lavinia and William - Applications for AIM missionary service. Other correspondence.
    1908; Capern - Correspondence.
    1907; Copeman, Rosetta - Correspondence.
    1915-1916; Crebbin, Miss - Petition from residents of Moonah Cullah Aboriginal Reserve to prolong the stay of missionary Miss Crebbin.
    1913; Dietrich, Elsie May - Application for AIM missionary service.
    Letters.
    1906, 1915; Dodimead, Julia - Application for missionary work. Death notice.
    1913-1916; Gates, Robert Henry - Application for AIM missionary service.
    Correspondence.
    1907-1908; Harrington, Mr - Correspondence.
    c.1916; Heather, Ernest - Application for AIM missionary service.
    c.1908; Jackson, Emily - Letter to Mrs Long.
    n.d.; Lewis, Annie - Application for AIM missionary service.
    1908; McGregor, Mary - Letter. Tommys letter.
    c.1907-1909; Mrs E. McKenzie - Correspondence.
    1907; Macpherson, Miss - Correspondence.
    1907-1908; Morris, Marie - Correspondence.
    1914-1916; Partridge, Alice - Application for AIM missionary service.
    c.1920; Preston, Mr - Letter.
    n.d.; Ruddell, Jean - Correspondence.
    1907; Russell, Alec Native Worker - Letter to Mrs Long.
    1916-1920; Schenk, Rudolph - Application for AIM missionary service. Correspondence.
    n.d.; Wilson, Robert Hugh - Application for AIM for missionary service.

    2. AIM records and correspondence
    1907-1920; AIM correspondence - various.
    1916-1920; Excerpts from AIM account books.
    1909-1919; China Inland Mission.
    1904-1923; Correspondence.

    3. Records relating to Singleton Aboriginal Childrens Home
    c.1913; Jarvis, Bertha - Correspondence regarding Singleton Childrens Home.
    1917; Cragg, William (solicitor) - Correspondence regarding the sale of Glasgow Place on behalf of Sir Albert Gould.
    1907, 1909; Heath, Maria - Correspondence regarding Maria Heath, Aboriginal girl from Merriwa, NSW.
    1907-1914; Singleton Childrens Home - Correspondence, some NSW Office for the Protection of Aborigines, regarding various children at Singleton Childrens Home, including Lily Kermode. Includes Aborigines Protection Board correspondence.
    1914-1922; Smith, George Colton - Correspondence relating to George Colton Smith, Superintendent of Singleton Childrens Home. Includes notes on various children and Aboriginal Protection Board correspondence.
    1908; Matrons position at Childrens Home.


    Topic:
    Aboriginal peoples (Australians)
    Name:
    Acland, Margaret
    Belshaw, Mary
    Dixon, Retta, 1877-1953
    Gates, Robert Henry
    Heath, Maria
    Long, Leonard
    Russell, Alec
    Schenk, Rudolph
    Smith, George Colton
  • Source
    Presented by Christine Brett in October 2002
  • Access Conditions

    This material is held offsite and can take up to four days to retrieve.
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